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Pennsylvania Native Species Day

The Pennsylvania Governor's Invasive Species Council and partners around the state celebrated the third annual Pennsylvania Native Species Day on Thursday, May 16, 2024 at Big Elk Creek State Park.


To watch the livestream, head to our Facebook ​​page.




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PA Native Species Day Partner Events



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Native

​Invasive

 Content Editor ‭[2]‬

Resources on Pennsylvania Native Species and Invasive Species

While not meant to be an exhaustive list, the sources above may help you learn which species are native and more.

Why protect Pennsylvania’s native species?

Pennsylvania is home to diverse native plants, trees, insects, fish, birds, and mammals that originated thousands of years ago and thrive in mutual dependence. This native ecosystem provides us with natural resources that benefit our lives by enabling agricultural food production, recreation, fisheries, timber, and more.

As humans have increased worldwide commerce and travel, nonnative species have crisscrossed the world with us. When species are transported to areas outside their native range, they have no natural predators. They often invade, crowding out and threatening the survival of native species.

The council created Pennsylvania Native Species Day to celebrate the state’s diverse native species and increase Pennsylvanians’ understanding of the importance of protecting them against the proliferation of invasive species.


2023 Pennsylvania Native Species Day

In 2023, leaders from the state Departments of Agriculture, Transportation, Environmental Protection, and Conservation and Natural Resources; the Pennsylvania Game Commission and Fish and Boat Commission; and the Pennsylvania Landscape and Nursery Association visited North Creek Nurseries in Landenburg, Chester County. 

They highlighted actions state agencies are taking to help counter the proliferation of invasive species and their increasing ecological, economic, and public health impacts in Pennsylvania. North Creek owner Steve Castorani gave a tour of the grounds of this 70 percent native plant grower and wholesaler.